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Thomas Bourn

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Born:

1824/25, London

Baptised:

Died:

Buried:

 

Thomas Bourn was a London-born stockbroker who in retirement lived in Whitby, but seems possibly to have alternated residence between London and Whitby.

 

Non-Chess Life

 

Finding the Whitby chess-player in the censuses of 1841, 1851 and 1861 is difficult.  It may well be that he was in London, which makes tracking someone with an unremarkable name the more difficult.

 

F. White’s General Directory of Kingston-upon-Hull, and York, 1851, listed Thomas Rymer Bourne [with an “e”] alum manufacturer &c, with his home at Carr Hall, Whitby, and listed Thomas Rymer Bourne & Co. at Peak Works, Whitby.  Alum manufacture involved mining (or quarrying) activity on the coast near Whitby.  Gillbank’s Whitby directory of 1855 listed T. R. Bourne [with an “e”] at 17 St. Hilda’s Terrace, a large property overlooking Pannet Park, and Kelly’s Whitby directory of 1857 listed Thomas Rymer Bourn [no “e”] at St. Hilda’s Terrace.  This could have been the Thomas Rymer Bourne who was one of seven Bournes who where colliery owners in Sutton, Lancashire.  The similarity by name with Thomas Bourn is apparently merely coincidentental.

 

White’s Whitby directory of 1858 lists no Bourn(e)s in Whitby, so Thomas Rymer Bourn(e) had been overlooked, was elsewhere, or was dead, while the chess-player had presumably not arrived yet in Whitby.

 

Slater’s Whitby directory of 1864 listed Thomas Bourne [with an “e”] living at 3 Abbey Terrace, West Cliff, Whitby.  This was probably our man, and if so puts his arrival in Whitby as probably in 1861 give or take up to three years, more probably 1861 to 1864, given the apparent absence of a relevant 1861 census entry.

 

By 1865, quite possibly earlier, he had married his wife Mary, who was born 1826/27 at Ramsgate, Kent.  The couple had at least the following three children, which includes a stillbirth:

Mary M. Bourn

born 1865/66, Whitby

Alice Bourn

born 22/11/1867, Stockwell, London

stillborn

stillborn 15/01/1871, Brixton, London

 

Mary M. Bourn was born in 1865 or 1866, at Whitby.

 

White’s Whitby directory of 1867 listed no Bourn(e)s in Whitby, which with Alice’s place of birth suggests the family was back in London.

 

The Times of 25/11/1867 carried the following birth announcement:

On the 22nd inst., at 89, St. John's-terrace, Park-road, Stockwell, the wife of Thomas Bourn, of Whitby, of a daughter.

This birth is clearly that of Alice.  The notice neatly demonstrates the Bourns of Whitby spent some time in London.

 

The Times of 18/01/1871 carried the following sad announcement:
“On the 15th Jan., at 60, Knowle-road, Brixton, the wife of Thomas Bourn, of Whitby, of a daughter, stillborn.”

 

The 1871 census returns for that part of Whitby which was in the parish of Ruswarp found the Bourn family living at 11 Abbey Terrace, Whitby, with a final “e” appended to their surname.  46-year-old London-born Thomas Bourn(e) was described as a retired stockbroker.  His wife, Mary Bourn(e), was a 44-year-old born at Ramsgate, Kent.  Whitby-born daughter Mary M. Bourn(e) was five years old.  London-born daughter Alice Bourn(e) was three years old.  Living with them was Thomas’s mother, 70-year-old Billericay-born widow Mary Bourn(e), who had “interest form money”.  The household included two servants.  Abbey Terrace is off Back St. Hilda’s Terrace, in the West Cliff area of Whitby’s west bank.

 

Kelly’s Whitby directory of 1872 listed Thomas Bourn (under “Private residents”) living at 11 Abbey Terrace, Whitby.

 

Directories dated 1879 and 1890 listed no Bourn(e)s.

 

Death

 

Thomas Bourn, chess-player of Whitby, quite probably died at some time from 1872 to 1879, more probably 1872 or 1873, but he may have returned to London.

 

Chess

 

He was roped in to serve on the “General Committee” of the second Redcar chess meeting, in 1866, though what that entailed in practice is unclear.

 

He played correspondence chess, and a number of his games were published in the Chess Player’s Quarterly over the years 1868 to 1871:

 

in Chess Player’s Quarterly of 1868-1869

 

p. 14

Reid (Kent)

0‑1

Bourn (Whitby)

35 moves (not specified as a corres. game)

p. 42

T. Bourn (Whitby)

1‑0

G. F. Barry (Dublin C.C.)

29 moves, corres.

p. 77

Bourn (Whitby)

1‑0

Rynd (Dublin)

29 moves, corres.

p. 150

Rynd (Dublin)

0‑1

Bourn (Whitby)

29 moves, corres.

p. 199

Rev. T. Carnsew (Cornwall)

1‑0

T. Bourn

36+ moves, corres.

p. 200

T. Bourn

0‑1

Rev. T. Carnsew (Cornwall)

56 moves, corres.

p. 277

T. Bourn

1‑0

Rev. T. S. [sic] Carnsew

28 moves, corres.

 

 

 

 

 

in Chess Player’s Quarterly of 1870-1871

 

p. 9

Rev. T. Carnsew

1‑0

T. Bourn

28++ moves, corres.

p. 109

T. Bourn (Whitby)

0‑1

J. Halford (Brimingham)

28 moves, corres.

p. 161

Halford

0‑1

Bourn

45 moves, corres.

p. 172

T. Bourn

1‑0

Rev. T. Carnsew

38 moves, corres.

p. 209

J. Charleton

0‑1

T. Bourn

28 moves, corres.

p. 235

J. Charleton

0‑1

T. Bourn

40 moves, corres.

p. 275

T. Bourn

0‑1

Rev. T. Carnsew

35 moves, corres.

p. 298

T. Bourn

1‑0

B. W. Fisher

30 moves, corres.

p. 353

T. Bourn

1‑0

J. Charleton

26 moves, corres.

 

We don’t know how many games he lost, and didn’t submit for publication.  The above results don’t contain any noticeably brilliant results, except for the wins over James Alexander Porterfield Rynd, who was one of Ireland’s strongest players, and was seemingly then regarded as Irish Champion; he won the rarely-contested Irish Championship in 1865 and 1892, the only intervening championships held having been those of 1886 and 1889 when he appears not to have competed (though his son K. A. Rynd came third in 1889).

 

 

Created

07/01/2013

Copyright © 2013 Stephen John Mann

Census information is copyright of The National Archive, see UK Census Information

Last Updated

07/01/2013